Bob Dylan - Let me die in my footsteps (by perostoppogno)

npr:

Kainaz Amaria/NPR

The U.S.-Mexico border is not a line. It’s a place. We spent two weeks driving it — a 2,428 mile road trip. 

Here are 12 short stories sharing what we’ve found. 

All photographs are memento mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another person’s (or thing’s) mortality, vulnerability, mutability. Precisely by slicing out this moment and freezing it, all photographs testify to time’s relentless melt.

Susan Sontag (via blue-voids)

What I love most about Dutch floral design is the aspect of memento mori.

(via sariady)

(Source: museoleum)

pitchfork:

Jack White’s new solo album Lazaretto is out June 10—listen to an instrumental track from it called "High Ball Stepper".

pitchfork:

Jack White’s new solo album Lazaretto is out June 10—listen to an instrumental track from it called "High Ball Stepper".

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Viewfinders: Black Women Photographers

A collection of diverse photographs from black female photographers from the mid-1800s to the present captures important aspects of African American history and reveals the talent and courage of a small band of pioneering artists. Reissue. National ad/promo.

Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe…

began her formal training at age eight when her parents enrolled her in classes at the Art Institute of Chicago. When it was time for undergraduate studies, Moutoussamy-Ashe moved east to New York and received a B.F.A. degree in photography from The Cooper Union School of Art. After graduating in 1975, she worked as a graphic artist and photojournalist for WNBC-TV. In October 1976, Moutoussamy-Ashe was hired to take photographs at the United Negro College Fund tennis event, where she met tennis great, Arthur Ashe. The two married on February 20, 1977.

Throughout her career, Moutoussamy-Ashe has had frequent group and solo exhibitions at museums and galleries around the world including the Leica Gallery, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Brooklyn Museum of Art in New York; the Smithsonian and the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.; Galerie Herve Odermat in Paris and The Excelsior in Florence among others. Publications such as Life Magazine, The New York Times, People and the Associated Press have also featured her photography, disseminating it to a wider audience. In 2001, she hosted the documentary Crucible of the Millennium, which PBS broadcast nationwide…

Read more about Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe: http://www.thehistorymakers.com/biography/jeanne-moutoussamy-ashe-41

 

Not only old white men where masters of photography… Think ethnic and gender to get a new perspective.

(Source: goodreads.com)

What a shame

That they are blinded by the light as well as the darkness

-unkind

arpeggia:

Chris Burden - Shoot, 1971
"Performed in 1971 during the height of the Vietnam War, the piece could not be simpler or more radical: Burden called a group of friends into a gallery to watch an assistant shoot him with a .22 rifle. “The bullet went into my arm and went out the other side,” recalls Burden, who essentially treated his body as a sculptural material to be reshaped by the bullet’s passage. “It was really disgusting, and there was a smoking hole in my arm.” The extreme act defined Burden’s career but to some seemed inexplicable, if not entirely deranged. The artist counters that the piece, in fact, was carefully rehearsed to minimize the chance of more serious injury. Cheating death was never the intent, he insists. “I was trying to think about a big fear,” says Burden. “Rather than turn from it, I was trying to face it, to eke something out of it, to doodle it out.”"[W Magazine]

The greatness of man to understand their fears…
one of our favorite artists

arpeggia:

Chris Burden - Shoot, 1971

"Performed in 1971 during the height of the Vietnam War, the piece could not be simpler or more radical: Burden called a group of friends into a gallery to watch an assistant shoot him with a .22 rifle. “The bullet went into my arm and went out the other side,” recalls Burden, who essentially treated his body as a sculptural material to be reshaped by the bullet’s passage. “It was really disgusting, and there was a smoking hole in my arm.” The extreme act defined Burden’s career but to some seemed inexplicable, if not entirely deranged. The artist counters that the piece, in fact, was carefully rehearsed to minimize the chance of more serious injury. Cheating death was never the intent, he insists. “I was trying to think about a big fear,” says Burden. “Rather than turn from it, I was trying to face it, to eke something out of it, to doodle it out.”"[W Magazine]

The greatness of man to understand their fears…

one of our favorite artists